Tea: A History of the Drink That Changed the World

John Griffiths

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Tea: A History of the Drink That Changed the World

Tea A History of the Drink That Changed the World A fascinating account of the world s favorite beverage from the son of Sir Percival Griffiths author of the monumental and definitive tome The History of the Indian Tea Industry A study of the phenom

  • Title: Tea: A History of the Drink That Changed the World
  • Author: John Griffiths
  • ISBN: 9780233003139
  • Page: 333
  • Format: Paperback
  • A fascinating account of the world s favorite beverage from the son of Sir Percival Griffiths, author of the monumental and definitive tome The History of the Indian Tea Industry.A study of the phenomenon as well as the commodity, this is a comprehensive survey of the drink that is imbibed daily by than half the population of the world After water, tea is the secondA fascinating account of the world s favorite beverage from the son of Sir Percival Griffiths, author of the monumental and definitive tome The History of the Indian Tea Industry.A study of the phenomenon as well as the commodity, this is a comprehensive survey of the drink that is imbibed daily by than half the population of the world After water, tea is the second most consumed drink in the world Almost every corner of the globe is addressed in this comprehensive look at 4,500 years of tea history Tea has affected international relations, exposed divisions of class and race, shaped the ethics of business, and even led to significant advances in medicine Thoroughly researched and captivating, this is a unique study of the little green leaf.

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      Posted by:John Griffiths
      Published :2018-07-23T23:18:16+00:00

    One thought on “Tea: A History of the Drink That Changed the World

    1. Steven Scoular on said:

      Crazy teatail about one of my favourite drinks and how it quite literally changed the world's histeary. The way the words flow is very nice, the detail not too steep but informative all the same. Oolong with this, there's multiple little interesting tidbits scattered throughout, to keep even the greenest tea drinkers leafing through. Never a strain to read. I always chai to give as fair rebrews of books as possible, but I am probably a little biased, as to me it's a brewteaful drink and I love i [...]

    2. Liz on said:

      I couldn't finish this book, the editing was appalling. I don't blame the author, they tried to do something good, I blame the editor for this disaster of incomprehensible sentences, divergent grammar and general awfulness that should never have been published in this state.

    3. Sarah on said:

      Abandoned on page 34 of 373. A load of random facts thrown together.

    4. Ashley Catt on said:

      A more honest title for this book would be 'The Mostly Rich White Man's History of Tea', rather than claiming to be 'The History' of tea.I should start with the positives. Confusingly enough, this book is very interesting to read. Although, going through, there are SO many problems littered throughout, it's engaging. There doesn't seem to be any reason to mistrust the solid facts that are presented to you, and it's different to the orthodox in historical writing. Like tea itself, it is refreshin [...]

    5. Deb on said:

      "There were 24 tea cars on the beach at Dunkirk and all were destroyed by enemy fire or abandoned. Their crews were lucky to get back whole to England, but no sooner had they done so then they joined their colleagues dispensing tea to the thousands of exhausted troops of the evacuation. In the course of those next few days the Tea Cars served some five thousand gallons of tea."I believe in the sense of security and ability to be brave in the face of horrors that a simple comfort can rouse in us [...]

    6. Tara Brabazon on said:

      This is a book for the 'general' rather than academic reader. It is a bit 'overwritten' for my taste. It features richly mauve - if not purple - prose. However in understanding how and why tea is important and why it is popular, this is a solid book. For academics - look elsewhere for a cultural history. For general readers intrigued by tea, this book is interesting, rather than fascinating.

    7. Nancy Thormann on said:

      It's interesting to learn how tea came to Europe and the difficulties scientists had when naming the different teas - botanically speaking. I didn't know the Chinese were always so secretive about their products and so mistrustful of foreigners.

    8. James Nuttall on said:

      An interesting ramble through the history and influence of one of the world's most beloved beverage. Its an educational ramble, told with familiarity and fondness. Needless to say, best enjoyed with a cuppa.

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