Craven House

Patrick Hamilton

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Craven House

Craven House In Craven House among the shifting uncertain world of the English boarding house with its sad population of the shabby genteel on the way down and the eternal optimists who would never get up or on

  • Title: Craven House
  • Author: Patrick Hamilton
  • ISBN: 9780747407614
  • Page: 142
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Craven House, among the shifting, uncertain world of the English boarding house, with its sad population of the shabby genteel on the way down and the eternal optimists who would never get up or on the young Patrick Hamilton, with loving, horrified fascination, first mapped out the territory that he would make, uniquely, his own.Although many of Hamilton s lifelongIn Craven House, among the shifting, uncertain world of the English boarding house, with its sad population of the shabby genteel on the way down and the eternal optimists who would never get up or on the young Patrick Hamilton, with loving, horrified fascination, first mapped out the territory that he would make, uniquely, his own.Although many of Hamilton s lifelong interests are here, they are handled with a youthful brio and optimism conspicuously absent from his later work The inmates of Craven House have their foibles, but most are indulgently treated by an author whose world view has yet to harden from scepticism into cynicism.The generational conflicts of Hamilton s own youth thread throughout the narrative, with hair bobbing and dancing as the battle lines That perennial of the 1920s bourgeoisie, the servant problem , is never far from the surface, and tensions crescendo gradually to a resolution one climactic dinnertime.

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      Posted by:Patrick Hamilton
      Published :2019-01-13T22:02:35+00:00

    One thought on “Craven House

    1. Diane Barnes on said:

      English boarding houses seem to be a rich topic for authors to explore, given the fact that many different ages and personalities are thrown together because, let's face it, they have no where else to go. Patrick Hamilton, one of my new favorite author discoveries (thank you, Doug) seems to be a master at this. This is his first novel, written when he was 21, and is so much fun to read that it's almost a shame. Many laugh out loud moments, such great dialogue, done in a most original way, and a [...]

    2. Doug H on said:

      4.5 stars. This novel was a joy to read and read like it was a joy for Hamilton to write. I'd give it five stars for pure enjoyment, but I'm ranking it a shade below The Slaves of Solitude and Hangover Square because they're even better.Patrick Hamilton is one of my favorite writers and I'd never even heard of him before last year. Apparently you have to join and stumble upon rave reviews in order to discover him.How could such a great writer seemingly slip into relative obscurity? Unless it's [...]

    3. Nigeyb on said:

      This book is a joy. Yes, Hangover Square and The Slaves of Solitude are Patrick Hamilton's masterpieces however this book is every bit as enjoyable. Playful, jaunty, and very sentimental, it is interesting to read Hamilton in a more positive mood - before the cynicism and darkness really took hold. Craven House was the first major novel by Patrick Hamilton and was published in 1926, and captures that moment when, following World War 1, the certainties of the Edwardian way of life eroded until En [...]

    4. Peter on said:

      Craven House is the story of a genteel London boarding house and its inhabitants in the first two decades of the twentieth century – a sort of early practice piece for the later The Slaves of Solitude . Hamilton was only 21 when he wrote this early novel, so he had good reason to be pretty pleased with himself. It does show, however. The writing is a bit arch, to put it mildly, and too frequently employs a slightly smug, orotund style more usually associated with late nineteenth-century humori [...]

    5. Sophia on said:

      I seriously love Patrick Hamilton. This wasn't as "dark" as Twenty Thousand Streets or Hangover Square, but it nonetheless captured the deep, resounding sadness that each of his characters harbors, generally about how they feel inadequate in some capacity. He manages to craft a page-turner out the lives of 7-8 Londoners who live in a house together and are BEYOND ordinary, it's almost painful to imagine these people in real life. By the end of the novel, you feel like you've known them forever a [...]

    6. Livinginthecastle on said:

      I was a bit worried when I started reading this book, because I love Patrick Hamilton so my expectations were high, and for the first hundred pages I was a little disappointed.It read like a series of well-drawn character studies and their interactions in stifled, polite social situations; all very funny but not much of the characters' underlying emotions and turmoil was expressed here, so I wasn't as engaged as I have been previously. Then it started to get going and this book feels like a prac [...]

    7. Hargrove on said:

      I came to this recently, after having read a good deal of Patrick Hamilton, beginning with NYRB's Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky. I was delighted to locate the Black Spring Press 2008 Edition, along with Through a Glass Darkly, a Hamilton biography.My review consists simply of this: There is a finesse in this book, a seamless, a blend of domestic horror and absurdist comedy. If allowed, I would ask each reader to sample the chapter describing the Russian lady's inaugural dinner. I was not [...]

    8. THE on said:

      It is sometimes interesting to discover the evolution of a significant author and CRAVEN HOUSE provides such an opportunity for those interested in the growing literary acclaim of the late Patrick Hamilton (1904-62). Although most widely known for plays GASLIGHT and ROPE (adapted for the screen), the hard-drinking and earthy British author captured interwar and wartime Britain with sympathetic characters, precise dialogue, vivid descriptions, and fast-paced narratives reminiscent of a modern Dic [...]

    9. Gerard Woodward on said:

      Hamilton's 1st novel, written when he was 21 - brilliantly sets out the themes he was to write about in subsequent novels.

    10. Jakey Gee on said:

      [Being one of my all time favourite novelists].This one's warmer and more conventional perhaps than the Hamilton Blockbusters, but still gorgeous. It's worth noting too for how autobiographical it probably is (Chiswick, early career, boarding houses, disappearing fathers). Master Wildman's schooldays should sit alongside Copperfield's for the accuracy and comedy of that picture. The dialogue between him and Elsie - trying ever so hard to be dismissive and clever - is just perfect. I know it's a [...]

    11. Sarah Carless on said:

      AddictedI'm so taken with Patrick Hamilton's writing I can scarcely approach the end of one of his books without worrying it'll be the last one I haven't yet read. He writes like Elizabeth Taylor (no, the novelist, not the actor) with a generous topping of (usually) gentle humour. Understated, introspective, brilliantly observed and, to me, unputdownable. I wish I had known him.

    12. Gillian King on said:

      Once one of my favourite writers, but not as good as I remembered now I am older

    13. Angela on said:

      The language of the book is very much of its time and some readers may find that difficult. Essentially a love story, the characters are all inhabitants of a boarding house in London. As Hamilton weaves his various plots lines together the role played by the house assumes a greater importance and almost becomes a character within the narrative itself - but not invasively or in a sinister way. So the ending, which I could not predict has a pathos that gradually creeps up on the reader. The charac [...]

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