The Innocence and Wisdom of Father Brown

G.K. Chesterton Bruce F. Murphy

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The Innocence and Wisdom of Father Brown

The Innocence and Wisdom of Father Brown Contrary to first impressions G K Chesterton s Father Brown is not senile nor easily rattled In fact this village priest wanders into challenges that pale in comparison to the things he has heard t

  • Title: The Innocence and Wisdom of Father Brown
  • Author: G.K. Chesterton Bruce F. Murphy
  • ISBN: 9781411428867
  • Page: 455
  • Format: ebook
  • Contrary to first impressions, G K Chesterton s Father Brown is not senile, nor easily rattled In fact, this village priest wanders into challenges that pale in comparison to the things he has heard through the screen of the confessional For to hear Father Brown tell it, crime is a manifestation of sin the criminal must be caught, but he or she must also be saved theContrary to first impressions, G K Chesterton s Father Brown is not senile, nor easily rattled In fact, this village priest wanders into challenges that pale in comparison to the things he has heard through the screen of the confessional For to hear Father Brown tell it, crime is a manifestation of sin the criminal must be caught, but he or she must also be saved the culprit has to be locked up, but the spirit must be freed.

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      455 G.K. Chesterton Bruce F. Murphy
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      Posted by:G.K. Chesterton Bruce F. Murphy
      Published :2019-02-02T11:13:27+00:00

    One thought on “The Innocence and Wisdom of Father Brown

    1. Jesse on said:

      Clever, endlessly clever little mysteries of the old-school end-of-the-British Empire sort that unspool in about a dozen pages or less Chesteron isn't as consistently ingenious as Agatha Christie, but he's sure as hell a better prose stylist: his beautifully spare descriptions of British geography, often opening the stories, are glorious in their economy ("a stormy evening of olive and silver was closing in;" "that singular smoky sparkle, at once a confusion and a transparency, which is the stra [...]

    2. Michael on said:

      A collection of two collections of stories about the famous Father Brown, a creation of Chesterton's inspired by his meeting with an actual Catholic priest. Chesterton had expected to show the priest, whom he viewed as cloistered, sheltered, and ignorant of the ways of the world, how much more he knew about human nature, only to find that the priest had plumbed the depths of those waters far deeper than he. It really makes sense; as priests hear confession, they are likely to be the most familia [...]

    3. Seth on said:

      Father Brown mysteries are a charming exercise in multiple plotlines supported by identical events (I think in one chapter Father Brown extrapolates four potential stories from a single set of facts, mostly just to prove that he can). G.K. Chesterton is somewhat dated, but still a fun read or, in my case, a listen (yay Librivox!). The mysteries are mostly of the twilight of the British Empire variety, but with careful observation (and focus) on general human frailties. I found myself smiling abo [...]

    4. Janice Sears on said:

      Father Brown solves mysteries and the way he arrives at his conclusions may put you in mind of Sherlock Holmes. I thoroughly enjoyed these stories and was sorry when I had read them all that there were not more of them to read. G. K. Chesterton is very readable and hard to put down. There are other G. K. Chesterton short story collections, like "The Man Who Knew Too Much", and they are equally pleasurable reads. Don't miss this wonderful author!

    5. David on said:

      Originally two volumes, The Innocence of Father Brown, and the Wisdom of Father Brown, each contain a dozen short mystery stories, each solved by the insightful Father Brown and often his friend Flambeau. Father Brown solves his crimes through a careful reasoning based on his spiritual and philosophic insights more than scientific details. They were fun to read, but not nearly as involved as some other mystery stories.

    6. T.E. on said:

      Read through several of the stories and am quite in love. Such an adorable, ingenious little priest! The stories are all very quick but quite clever, and the prose is very well done, particularly considering it's a mystery novel

    7. Evan on said:

      I like this book's accessibility. I can pick it up and read a good story and then put it back down.I'm sorry to say that this is a bit of downfall for me as well. I have to back-burner this book for now, but I recommend it!

    8. Tori on said:

      All the intrigue and wit of Sherlock Holm paired with the beautiful writing of Chesterton makes for a fantastic book of mysteries. I'm very happy to have read the book and proud to have a copy for my bookshelves. A must read for any fan of the genre.

    9. Jennifer on said:

      Very fun to pick up and read when you want a quick mystery fix. It has all the improbability of the larger than life Sherlock Holmes, but Father Brown is humble, unimpressive, and caring. Chesterton provides much deeper insight into fallen humanity than does Conan-Doyle.

    10. Joshua on said:

      "The Prince of Paradox" gives us a sleuth who is just as concerned with apprehending the felon as he is with saving his soul. Short, fun, thought-provoking stories that make you feel like a grown-up child.

    11. Steve on said:

      The Father Brown mysteries are wonderful to read. These stories are full of Chesterton's wit and perceptiveness. Worth reading and enjoying.

    12. Nancy Newkirk on said:

      I had read this years ago and thought I'd try it again. Still interesting and fun.

    13. Vs on said:

      This is real fun and thought mixed togetherlaxing yet mind pinching love it

    14. Taylor on said:

      Found this on Gutenberg since I have been looking at the public domain books. Fun stories, although not too involved.

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