The Essential Erasmus

Erasmus John P. Dolan

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The Essential Erasmus

The Essential Erasmus In his own day a center of controversy in the four hundred years since his death known too often solely as an apostle of mockery and irreverence Erasmus can be seen today in a new light as a humanis

  • Title: The Essential Erasmus
  • Author: Erasmus John P. Dolan
  • ISBN: 9780452009721
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Paperback
  • In his own day a center of controversy, in the four hundred years since his death known too often solely as an apostle of mockery and irreverence, Erasmus can be seen today in a new light as a humanist whose concen is at once contemporary and Christian.The Essential Erasmus is the first single volume in English to show the full spectrum of this Renaissance man s thought, wIn his own day a center of controversy, in the four hundred years since his death known too often solely as an apostle of mockery and irreverence, Erasmus can be seen today in a new light as a humanist whose concen is at once contemporary and Christian.The Essential Erasmus is the first single volume in English to show the full spectrum of this Renaissance man s thought, which is no less profound because it is expressed with the grace, wit, and ironic detachment only a great writer can achieve.Contains the full text of In Praise of Folly

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    One thought on “The Essential Erasmus

    1. Kevin Fuller on said:

      Handbook for the Militant Christian. Sounds offputting doesn't it? A call to arms to defeat some faceless infidel, a war cry to wage against the world? In a word, no.In the last chapter, Erasmus makes no bones that we are to forgive those who harm us and love those who would do us ill. We should look to the Supreme Example, Christ, who died for a world that didn't accept Him, and in so doing gained the keys to the Kingdom. Revenge only deepens hurt and portends disaster, Erasmus lets us know on [...]

    2. Amy on said:

      I read only the first part, the "Handbook of the Militant Christian," and I was very impressed with what Erasmus had to say. He cautions against complacency when life is a constant battle against Satan; if we forget that, we feel less need to rely on God, and Satan is able to gain ground on us. I intend to read more of his writing once I get the book back (managed to leave it at school; yay me :P)Erasmus is a very good person to read.

    3. Mario on said:

      The writing is a bit stiff, and I absolutely hate his unending lists. Seriously, one or two examples is fine, you really don't need to write every single one you can think of. We get your point.It's easy to see how Erasmus was influential in his time, but (to his credit, really) so many of his ideas are now commonplace that it's tough for a modern reader to get an unadulterated sense of it (like when I watched Casablanca; I found it hard to enjoy the movie because it was so full of clichés). If [...]

    4. Humphrey on said:

      Clarification: Read the Enchiridion ("Handbook of the Militant Christian" is a rather unfortunate translation) and the Complain of Peace. The latter suffers from what I take to be a frequent shortcoming of Erasmus' less-intellectual writings: it is exceedingly repetitive. The Enchiridion - a guide to "practical piety" - doesn't have this problem, and indeed is an enjoyable text in the tradition of Thomas a Kempis' De Imitatione Christi (though somewhat less spiritual).

    5. Megan on said:

      i've only read the dedication to thomas more so far, but three seemingly unrelated (ok, two were totally related) points spanning five years have brought me to this fourth point, which is digging "the praise of folly"

    6. Karen on said:

      If you're into reformation theology, by all means, read it. If this is not your interest you've been warned!

    7. CHAM on said:

      The first text we read in my junior year Reformation Thought (Dr. J. Michael Utzinger) class. The over-arching question we always kept in mind : "Is Erasmus a heretic?"

    8. Joshua on said:

      Another book I never got through. What I read of it was good though, I love the Renaissance lit.

    9. Victoria on said:

      This book is fascinating and timeless; especially the enchiridion. His essay written from the point of Folly is unbelievably clever. I love this book!

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