Everybody Is Wrong About God

James A. Lindsay

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Everybody Is Wrong About God

Everybody Is Wrong About God A call to action to address people s psychological and social motives for a belief in God rather than debate the existence of God With every argument for theism long since discredited the result is

  • Title: Everybody Is Wrong About God
  • Author: James A. Lindsay
  • ISBN: 9781634310369
  • Page: 402
  • Format: Paperback
  • A call to action to address people s psychological and social motives for a belief in God, rather than debate the existence of God With every argument for theism long since discredited, the result is that atheism has become little than the noises reasonable people make in the presence of unjustified religious beliefs Thus, engaging in interminable debate with reliA call to action to address people s psychological and social motives for a belief in God, rather than debate the existence of God With every argument for theism long since discredited, the result is that atheism has become little than the noises reasonable people make in the presence of unjustified religious beliefs Thus, engaging in interminable debate with religious believers about the existence of God has become exactly the wrong way for nonbelievers to try to deal with misguided and often dangerous belief in a higher power The key, author James Lindsay argues, is to stop that particular conversation He demonstrates that whenever people say they believe in God, they are really telling us that they have certain psychological and social needs that they do not know how to meet Lindsay then provides productive avenues of discussion and action Once nonbelievers understand this simple point, and drop the very label of atheist, will they be able to change the way we all think about, talk about, and act upon the troublesome notion called God.

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    One thought on “Everybody Is Wrong About God

    1. Ryan Bell on said:

      James Lindsay claims that atheism and theism exist in a kind of symbiosis, one enabling the existence of the other. Atheism is a not-thing; a negation. It exists as a counterpoint to theism and can only continue to be a distinct idea if the notion of theism is still a credible set of ideas. Escaping from this vortex is essential if we are to move to the important issues facing humanity and the planet. We do this, Lindsay argues, by calling the question on theism, pronouncing it dead, and then mo [...]

    2. Steve on said:

      A refreshing book that explores the psychosocial needs that are met by a belief in a deity. The book assumes that the debate over God’s existence is over and that it is demonstrably false — a contentious assumption despite the assertion by the author that it is no longer worthy of any further discussion and could perhaps be seen as a somewhat arrogant assertion. However, if one is prepared to accept this starting point for the sake of argument, Lindsay provides a rich and complex analysis of [...]

    3. Melinda on said:

      Wow. Not many words for this review. A bit of a mind fuck to be honest - perhaps I just wasnt in the headspace to truly appreciate the arguments here atm. Think this will require digestion time and another read I think this book makes some very interesting points - and would be a great discussion starter

    4. Max Moore on said:

      A bit repetitive, otherwise this book is a debate opener. The author makes several good observations about the so-called "Great Debate", especially why, instead of wasting time with philosophical-style arguments about religion, we should be taking on projects that address the main reason people hold their beliefs and thus help them become free of faith. A good supplement to Peter Boghossian's Street Epistemology, John W. Loftus' Outsider Test of Faith and Jonathan Haidt's The Righteous Mind.

    5. Douglas on said:

      Suffers from a seemingly common New Atheist pitfall of ignorance about the topic making the author feel like an innovator. Nothing I didn't encounter as a first year religion student 19 years ago, except for some of the absurd conclusions, poor definitions, and palpable self-satisfaction.

    6. Brendon Brewer on said:

      I picked up this book after following James Lindsay (the author) on Twitter, where I was impressed by his thoughtful positions on moral controversies. I was curious about it, having been a somewhat "aggressive" (in speech only, of course) atheist a while back.Lindsay argues that, if we're going to talk about God at all, we should stop having debates about metaphysics and instead learn some psychology of religion. Most people believe not because of some philosophical logic, but in order to, as Li [...]

    7. Mark Jochem on said:

      Great read. The author makes good points about why atheism should become obsolete after (post) theism. It doesn't pounce on religiosity as a 'delusion' or something to be ridiculed, but understood as a means to meet psychological and social needs. Atheism is only an antithesis to theism, not a worldview and not useful as way to explore and explain the universe.

    8. Charlie on said:

      If you are already non-religious, then I think this is the single best book you can read on the subject of God/atheism. Everybody Is Wrong About God completely changed the way that I think about atheism. This book is highly recommended and James Lindsay delivers as usual.

    9. Nick on said:

      Really enjoyable book. It manages to be unapologetic and lucid in its ideas without slipping into the tiresome condescension or feigned, theatrical incredulity that blights so much writing on the subject.

    10. bfilbeck on said:

      An exercise in word manipulation with no point. Don't waste your time.

    11. KC on said:

      Initially lured in presuming it would be a thought-provoking, paradigm-shifting new approach to theology or spiritual engagement, it turned out to be a self-appointed sequel to the discussion forged by Dawkins, Harris, et. al, about how to rid society of belief in a God.Undaunted, I plowed forward, having fairly thoroughly acquainted myself with the premises of "new atheism" many years ago, and, even as a person of faith, disagree with only very few of them. (I happen to married to an evolutiona [...]

    12. Kiseruyoru on said:

      This book needed one sentence: "God is a psychological and societal construct, and is best considered not thru the lens of deity, but thru the lens of psychological and sociological needs."I don't actually disagree with anything in this book. But I don't feel it is well presented. The key point is I cannot, in any circumstance, imagine this swaying anyone who does not already agree with him, or would have done if they'd thought of it on their own first. But for that small second subset, who just [...]

    13. Michael Gat on said:

      I've never been completely comfortable with the term "atheist" because I've thought it describes me in terms of what I don't do/believe rather than in terms of what I find to be true. I've often uses it in a qualified or hyphenated way, but prefer other terms. Lindsay starts from a similar premise, and in a Luke Skywalkerish kind of way, explains that more than a decade after "The God Delusion" it's time for "atheism" (as we know it) to die. Like the Jedi, it's fulfilled its purpose and somethin [...]

    14. Jason on said:

      I have a lot of books on this subject, perhaps all of the major ones, and I think the author makes many unique diamond bullet points that I haven't heard before. I made my mind up on this subject a long time ago (as a teenager), however, I'm still interested in why we as a civilization keep tripping up on the childhood deserve of mythology. The author lights a pathway out of the mythology quagmire—towards a post-theism world. Great read.

    15. Elle Wilson on said:

      Damn, does this guy think he's smarter than he is. Regurgitating basic arguments from religious studies/cultural studies classrooms and claiming he's the first one to come up with them? Check. Pseudointellectual rants that go on for way too long? Check. He'd be well served by some humble pie and a good editor.

    16. David on said:

      This author explains what religious belief does for believers. The same framework can be applied to politics.

    17. Geoff Glenister on said:

      A friend of mine recommended this. I absolutely loved the beginning parts and found the idea of "post-theistic" rather than "atheistic" to be helpful. And I really liked his analogy of the sound-board and understanding that people have differing beliefs in what their God-concept really means.But.I lead a discussion group whose purpose is to foster inter-religious dialogue (including, or maybe especially, between atheists and Christians). This is something that matters deeply to me for many reaso [...]

    18. Phil Greaney on said:

      Read this book if you're interested in how a 'post-theistic' society might develop from a 'god is dead' hypothesisLindsay begins his invigorating book (true if you're a believer or otherwise) by asserting that the argument regarding the existence of god has been won and that the world has decided: people don’t believe in god anymore (intellectually speaking, that is).If you look around you, you might be surprised by this suggestion. It seems that we find the religious everywhere. In places lik [...]

    19. Cameron on said:

      When God is dead, what happens to Atheism? It goes in the trash with everything else.If God is dead, why does He persist? Because people (also) believe in "God" to provide for psychological and social needs.Since God is dead, can these needs be met in a secular way? Absolutely.Let's go post-theistic!

    20. j_ay on said:

      Some very interesting ideas. As someone who never liked the term Atheist I would like to see more things in the 'non belief of silly things' go in the post-theistic direction.

    21. David Chivers on said:

      A thought provoking book arguing that it's time to move the debate from whether God exists to what do most people mean when they talk about God. See my full review on TheHumanist.

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